Ruth Bader Ginsburg, unbowed by cancer, brings Buffalo audiences to their feet – Buffalo News

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, unbowed by cancer, brings Buffalo audiences to their feet - Buffalo News
Heres what we know about Ruth Bader Ginsburgs latest cancer scare
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has had a storied life as one of the pioneers among women who entered law in the early 1950s at a time when she, as one of nine women in a class of 500 at Harvard Law School, was barred from entering the periodical room merely because she was a woman.

It was among many stories Ginsburg shared with a packed crowd in Kleinhans Music Hall over an hours time Monday evening.

In the coming years, the Supreme Court is expected to weigh in on some of the nation's most divisive issues, such as the power of big business, the Second Amendment, LGBT rights and abortion. If Ginsburg retires while a Republican controls the presidency, conservatives are likely to be able to wield more influence over the direction of the country for years to come.

Video: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg receives honorary law degree from the University at Buffalo

As Aviva Abramovsky, dean of the University at Buffalo Law School, observed, Ginsburgs work has helped build the foundation of equality for all women.

First appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1993, she was only the second woman on the bench after Justice Sandra Day OConnor, who Ginsburg recalled as taking on the role of “big sister to her.”

There is reason to believe that Ginsburg has the less common, more survivable form of cancer. That is because Ginsburg was treated for pancreatic cancer 10 years ago, and is still alive. That makes it likely that Ginsburg had neuroendocrine carcinoma, and that it came back, Mount Sinai's Flores said.

Video: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gets standing ovation

Ruth Bader Ginsburg marvels at Notorious RBG nickname after getting honorary law degree

Ginsburg recalled that one of the first cases assigned to her by then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist was an extraordinarily tough and tedious one, which was not the usual protocol for associate justices newly appointed to the court, she recalled.

“Ruth, you just do it. Otherwise, youre going to risk getting another unpleasant case,” she recalled OConnor advising her.

The court said that because of Ginsburg's treatment, she cancelled her annual trip to Santa Fe, where she typically travels in the summer to appreciate the local opera and art scene. But, it noted, she has "otherwise maintained an active schedule."

U.S. Justice Ginsburg makes first appearance since latest cancer scare

Just getting it done, and getting it done well, was a pressure Ginsburg said she felt very early, even in law school. If women didnt perform well in that arena, she said, it tended to reflect poorly on their whole gender, she said.

At The New York Times, a former newspaper, editor-in-chief Blithering Prevarication the Third was informed of Ginsburgs illness and immediately called off his Koch death celebration, stopped dancing around a pentagram while dressed as a goat, and assigned his entire op-ed page to women who had been sexually mistreated themselves and were therefore convinced that whoever came forward to accuse whoever was appointed to replace Ginsburg if Ginsburg died would be telling the truth.

As more women started coming into the profession in increasing numbers, others gained the courage to enter law school, she said, recalling that 1972 was a watershed year.

Editors at CNN cleared the schedule there to make room for all the women who would come forward after the first accuser to create an atmosphere of credibility that CNN commentators could discuss with sanctimonious looks on their faces. CNN was immediately besieged by neurotics, floozies and prostitutes auditioning for the accuser parts. Several of them will be hosting new talk shows on the cable network this fall.

“Law schools around the country were concerned about losing male students to the Vietnam draft, so there was an over-admittance of women,” Ginsburg said.

She described it as “exhilarating” to see women today in the profession as faculty and deans of law schools, as well as students.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Appears in Public For The First Time Since Sharing Her Recent Cancer Treatment — Heres What We Know About The Type of Radiation She Received

“The closed-door era is indeed over,” Ginsburg said. “No, its not perfect, but how far we have traveled.”

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is having serious health problems and Democrat leaders have announced that in the unfortunate event she should pass away, whoever Trump appoints to replace her will be guilty of sexual misconduct.

Video: UBs Q&A with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Ginsburg even recalled the journey to striking down gender-based laws, recalling a 1961 case in which a battered wife in Florida struck her abusive husband over the head with a baseball bat during a physical confrontation.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg receives an honorary degree from the University at Buffalo on Monday, Aug. 26. (Mark Mulville/Buffalo News)

Share Dartunorro Clark Aug 26th 2019 5:43PM Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared to be in good spirits on Monday as she made her first public appearance since receiving treatment for cancer.

“It was the end of the fight and the start of a murder prosecution,” she said, noting the woman was eventually convicted by an all-male jury.”By the end of the 1970s, almost all of the explicit gender classification laws were over,”  Ginsburg said.

Ginsburg, a leader of courts liberal wing whose scathing dissents earned her the “Notorious RBG” nickname and in turn spawned memes and a recent documentary, even quipped about her newfound fame.

Asked about the U.S. Supreme Court nominating and approval process, she said it is far more partisan today.

Justice Ginsburg has Third Bout with Cancer, Second in 8 Months

In 1993, she said, there was a “true bipartisan spirit” in the U.S. Senate. Even so, there were some among her supporters who were worried about her connections to the American Civil Liberties Union. However, not one question about those connections came up during her Senate hearings. Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah was in her corner then, she said.

As the leader of the Supreme Court's liberal wing, Ginsburg has become somewhat of a pop culture phenomenon. She's earned the name "Notorious RBG" and was the subject of a recent documentary, "RBG," that focused on her life and career. A feature film, "On the Basis of Sex," is based on her early cases as a young attorney.

“Enough of this dysfunctional legislature. Were supposed to serve the people of the the United States,” Ginsburg said.

"In July 2018, Wayne wrote to me that his health disabled him from playing a lead role in the arrangements for my visit here but he still hoped to attend all the events," she said. "He asked me to confirm that I would come to Buffalo in August 2019 in any event. I did so immediately and I did not withdraw when my own health problems presented challenges."

Praise Be, Ruth Bader Ginsburg Is Out and About Following Cancer Treatment

The evening was held in Kleinhans in honor of the late Wayne Wisbaum, an attorney and former Cornell University classmate of Ginsburgs who served as president and board chair of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and Kleinhans Music Hall Management. He was a grade below her, but they stayed in touch over the years, she recalled.

Ginsburg, a Brooklyn native, has been a crucial vote on the nine-member court, which often has voted along ideological lines. Her health has been the subject of scrutiny for progressives looking to stave off a third court appointment by President Trump and conservatives hopeful about adding another justice to overturn key rulings such as Roe v. Wade.

Ginsburg makes first public appearance since finishing treatment for pancreatic cancer

“Every time he came to D.C. to attend the American Law Institute … he used to say the same thing: Please come to Buffalo. And he was persistent,”

"It was beyond my wildest imagination that I would one day become 'Notorious RBG,'" she said during her acceptance speech, prompting laughter from the sold-out crowd. "I am now 86 years old, yet people of all ages want to take their picture with me — amazing."

Ginsburg Makes First Appearance Since News Of Cancer Treatment

“It is to my great sorrow that he is not here with us this evening, but when I promised him I would come, I didnt know this day would be preceded by three weeks of daily radiation. Like I said, I will not cancel Buffalo,”

The 86-year-old justice recently completed three weeks of radiation therapy at a New York City hospital to treat a malignant tumor on her pancreas. In a statement this past Friday, the Supreme Court justice said there was no evidence the disease remains.

Ginsburg may have recently completed radiation treatment for a pancreatic tumor, but you would never have known it from listening to her speak Monday morning at UB.

The 86-year-old justice recently completed radiation therapy for a cancerous tumor on her pancreas, but said she did not want her health problems to stop her from fulfilling a commitment she made last year to a fellow Cornell University alumnus and lawyer, Wayne Wisbaum, who has since died.

Thoughtful, sharp and witty, Ginsburg reflected on her pop culture status as the Notorious RBG, noting that she and rapper Notorious B.I.G. both hail from Brooklyn.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes an Appearance and Gets a Standing Ovation 3 Days After Reports of Cancer Treatment

“I am now 86 years old, yet people of all ages want to take their pictures with me,” she said after receiving an honorary degree from UB at the campuss Center for the Arts.

Addressing about 2,200 members of the legal community at Kleinhans Music Hall, Ginsburg said she opposed proposals to expand the number of justices on the Supreme Court, referring to it as court-packing, and lamented the bipartisan atmosphere in which judges are confirmed.

In her opening remarks on the first day of the fall semester, she recounted how her friend, conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, wrote the lone dissenting opinion in the Virginia Military Institute case, stating that women should not be allowed entry to the military college, which had a male-only admissions policy until the Supreme Court forced a change in 1996.

“The progress I have seen in my lifetime makes me optimistic for the future,” Ginsburg told the audience of mostly students and faculty. “Our communities, nation and world will be increasingly improved as women achieve their rightful place in all fields.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg makes first public appearance since completing cancer treatment

“As an illustration of our friendship, he came to my chambers one day, and he threw down a sheaf of papers and said, This is my penultimate draft of my VMI dissent. Im not yet ready to circulate it to the court, but I want to give you as much time as I can to answer it.”

Before a capacity crowd of about 1,700 at UBs Center for the Arts, the courts oldest member mused over her celebrity status, evident in “Saturday Night Live” parodies, T-shirts bearing her image, a CNN documentary and the movie, “On the Basis of Sex.”

She also recounted how Scalia and she were both opera lovers and how Scalia contended that Italian opera was the best. So Ginsburg invited him to see the German opera The Valkyrie at the Metropolitan Opera House.

Monday’s programming in Buffalo is the first leg of a busy sequence of events for Ginsburg. She will also appear Saturday at the 2019 Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington to discuss her book “My Own Words,” a collection of her writings and speeches. Thereafter, she will travel to Little Rock, Arkansas, on Sept. 3 to lecture at the Clinton Foundation and the University of Arkansas Clinton School of Public Service.

It was somewhat of a risk on my part because Valkyrie runs maybe five hours, but he was impressed, she said.

Ginsburg completed a three-week course of outpatient radiation therapy on Aug. 23  at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, after doctors identified a malignant tumor on her pancreas. The Supreme Court’s Public Information Office said the justice “tolerated treatment well” and shows no evidence of remaining disease.

Dan Caves, a second-year UB law student, was one of several who said they found the story of Ginsburg and Scalias friendship inspirational.

“Justice Ginsburg, thank you for being here with us today,” a school administrator told the justice before conferring an honorary doctorate of laws. “Thank you for all that you have done, and will continue to do, to make our nation more fair and just for everyone.”

We live in such difficult times right now, he said. It gives us hope. It gives us a model of what we can accomplish together if we just set aside our differences. Not everything is politics.

Doing her best impersonation, Tracie Bell, 10, of Sanborn, the daughter of new attorney Vickie Bell, showed up in RBG-style fashion and gavel to hear Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, speak at Kleinhans Music Hall on Monday, Aug. 26, 2019. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

The justice has navigated a host of health problems in recent months. Ginsburg fractured three ribs after falling in her chambers at the high court in November and had cancerous nodules removed from her left lung the following month.

Abisha Vijayashanthar, who is in her last year of law school, was struck by the same thing. If Ginsburg can find common ground with her political opposite, she said, It just shows we can all do it.

Ginsburg recounted the many women and professors who helped pave the way for her ascent to the Supreme Court, starting with her childhood role models: aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart and fictional girl detective Nancy Drew.

Her appearance at the UB North Campus in Amherst was the beginning of a day of events for Ginsburg, who spoke with law students and members of the Western New York law community after her morning appearance before faculty, staff and students.

UB President Satish Tripathi called Ginsburgs morning address the perfect way to open the first day of classes and reflected on Ginsburgs obvious strength, despite undergoing recent cancer treatment.

Speaking at the University at Buffalo on Monday, Ginsburg briefly referenced her health. She shared that her old friend from college at Cornell University, the attorney Wayne Wisbaum, who died in December, had invited her to Buffalo last year.

Ginsburg stood as a hood was draped over her and she received her honorary degree. She also stood to make some short remarks, expressing her sorrow that Wisbaum was not there to see it.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has made her first public appearance since the announcement last week that she had completed treatment for pancreatic cancer.

Long before Ginsburg was even scheduled to take the stage, seats in the Center for the Arts were filling up. Tickets to the morning event sold out within 15 minutes, Tripathi said.

“I was on a wait list,” said Debbie Lowe, who works in the UB School of Management. “I was able to get one ticket.”

Ginsburg studied law at Harvard and Columbia universities, graduating first in her class in 1959, but no New York City law firms would offer a job to a woman. During the 1970s, she argued a number of womens rights cases at the Supreme Court.

Recently, Ginsburgs profile has risen through the movie “On the Basis of Sex,” the documentary “RBG” and “Saturday Night Live” parodies.

“To see her speak is the opportunity of a lifetime,” said Eileen Marutiak Yildirim, an alumna and member of the Alumni Associations board of directors.

It was announced on Friday that Ginsburg underwent treatment this summer for a malignant tumor discovered on her pancreas.

When Abramovsky asked what advice Ginsburg had for other judges, Ginsburg said it was important to be patient and compassionate.

“The law doesnt exist somewhere in the sky,” she said. “It exists to govern society. Law exists to serve that society … to help keep society operating peacefully. I think its important to realize that law is not some sort of abstract exercise. It affects real people, and judges should be cognizant of how law affects the people that law is meant to serve.”


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