Mitch McConnell doesnt rule out confirming Supreme Court nominee in election year

Mitch McConnell doesn\t rule out confirming Supreme Court nominee in election year
When Susan Collins gaslit the nation: Was that the Republican Partys final surrender to Trump?
Share Ed Mazza Oct 10th 2018 4:40AM President Donald Trump on Tuesday fired off a tweet claiming Americans who protested against the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh were supposed to be paid ― and were angry that they didnt get their money.

He also repeated that claim at a rally in Iowa Tuesday night, saying phony protesters were supposed to be paid and now they want to protest because they didnt get paid yet and they want their money.

Writer Asra Q. Nomani appeared as a guest on Fox & Friends, a show Trump is known to watch, to talk about her Wall Street Journal article linking billionaire George Soros to a number of groups that have organized protests.

Democrats, you have reason for optimism. Never forget that Hillary Clinton got nearly 3 million more votes than Trump. That happened despite a tsunami of setbacks. The Republicans campaign to disenfranchise likely Clinton voters. The Russians working for Trump. James Comeys outrageous eleventh-hour reopening of the email probe. Bernie Sanders and his brigades trashing the Democratic candidate all the way to the convention. And the Clinton campaigns own missteps. Despite all that, only an Electoral College fluke could produce a Trump presidency.

Inside the Beltway: Lefts brutal tactics now in sharp focus

10 PHOTOS Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial swearing-in event at White House See Gallery Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial swearing-in event at White House U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh is congratulated by retired Justice Anthony Kennedy, as his wife Ashley and daughters Liza and Margaret, and President Donald Trump look on during his ceremonial public swearing-in at the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks during his ceremonial public swearing-in, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh takes his ceremonial oath as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh as they participate in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg Deputy Attorney General Rob Rosentein watches from the back from the room before U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaughs ceremonial public swearing-in at the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh takes his oath during his ceremonial public swearing-in as U.S. President Donald Trump and Kavanaughs daughters Liza and Margaret look on in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh hugs his wife Ashley as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh and retired Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy as they participate in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump while Kavanaughs wife Ashley and daughters Liza and Margaret look on in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg Up Next See Gallery

But Democrats can make up lost ground — if theyre smart. If theyre smart, theyll proceed in a cool, calm and controlled manner. The electorate outside the Trump base is a lot bigger than the Trump base. Donald Trumps crashing approval numbers in the middle of a strong economy reflect a public upset by the chaos, cruelty and unbridled nastiness. The U.S. has its disputes, even with allies, but only the inmates from crazytown would heap abuse on Canada.

A source close to the White House tells me that with an eye to getting Republicans excited about voting for Republicans in midterms, the president this year will be looking for "unexpected cultural flashpoints" — like the NFL and kneeling — that he can latch onto in person and on Twitter. The source said Trump "is going to be looking for opportunities to stir up the base, more than focusing on any particular legislation or issue."

“I believe this is a seminal moment in our political history — where the American people watched with growing dismay at the tactics of the Democrats and their leftist storm troops, from the disruptions of the left wing paid protesters at the first round of the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, to the roaming mobs at the Senate and the bizarre and wholly uncorroborated accusations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh, so at odds with everything else in his entire career and life — and which demanded the complete disregard of basic principles of due process,” political law attorney Cleta Mitchell tells Inside the Beltway.

I think we can accurately observe that the confirmation of the right-wing political operative and accused attempted rapist Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court counts as just such an "unexpected cultural flashpoint." And as predicted, Donald Trump is taking full advantage of it. Since it happens to be the same "cultural flashpoint" that hit his campaign at roughly the same moment in 2016, when the "Access Hollywood" tape of him bragging about assaulting women was reported, he undoubtedly sees it as a winning strategy. It worked for him, after all.

“I believe that Sen. Susan Collins‘ remarkably courageous speech on the Senate floor may well prove to be a turning point, and perhaps will result in a demand by the American people that the Senate end these search and destroy tactics surrounding Supreme Court nominees. The left started these tactics with the nomination of Robert Bork, and they have grown increasingly more vile and outrageous through the years. I believe Sen. Lindsey Graham’s statement a week ago in the Judiciary Committee and Sen. Collins’ floor speech on Friday may well change the course of the nominations process,” says Ms. Mitchell.

Recall that after the tape hit and women started to come forward to say that Trump had assaulted them in exactly the way he described, he went on the offensive — in both senses of the word — by going before his cheering crowds and insulting the women as being too ugly to attack and declaring that they were all liars. He got angry. He promised to sue them all. And his crowds cheered him on. By this point in the campaign it had become nothing more than a rank racist misogyny festival, punctuated with chants of "Build That Wall!" and "Lock Her Up!"

“Our canvassers effectively cut through the noise of television and radio ads one conversation at a time, educating voters about their senator’s extreme pro-abortion record and the importance of this election. We are taking the fight for a pro-life Senate to the neighborhoods of states like Ohio, Indiana, Florida, Missouri, North Dakota, West Virginia and Montana, where vulnerable senators up for re-election have betrayed their constituents by failing to protect unborn babies and their mothers. They will be held accountable at the ballot box,” says Mrs. Dannenfelser.

Trump being Trump and believing that his every passing thought is genius, obviously believes that attacking women is an excellent way to win elections. And so, after insincerely proclaiming that he found her testimony credible, he switched gears and went after Kavanaugh's accuser Christine Blasey Ford:

Beyond the sexual assault allegations, Kavanaugh did not have the requisite demeanor for a Supreme Court justice. If I went to a job interview, yelled, cried and proclaimed that “I like beer,” I would not be hired. And my job doesn’t have the gravity of a Supreme Court justice.

Trump jokes about impeachment on the campaign trail

After the vote, Trump took credit for getting Kavanaugh over the line with this attack, telling Fox News' Jeanine Pirro, There were a lot of things happening that werent true and a lot of things left unsaid. I thought I had to even the playing field. Once I did that, it started to sail through. This was nonsense in terms of the confirmation battle, but according to the Washington Post, GOP strategists believe it does fire up the conservative base.

Video: Will Trump get another Supreme Court pick?

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is certainly on board. He's been pushing the other "unexpected cultural flashpoint" they've adopted, which is that those women who came to Washington to protest the Kavanaugh confirmation, many of them assault survivors, are an angry, threatening mob who frightened those poor senators to death with all their chanting and  yelling.

Although he missed the courts first week, none of the six cases argued dealt with blockbuster issues. They included a case about a potential habitat for an endangered frog and another about an Alabama death row inmate whose lawyers argue he shouldnt be executed because dementia has left him unable to remember his crime. Kavanaugh wont vote in those cases, but if the court is split 4-4, it could decide to have those cases reargued so Kavanaugh can break the tie.

Video: How Kavanaugh will change the Supreme Court

Fox News has taken it to the next level, telling their anxious elderly white viewers that Democrats are coming to kill them in their beds, following Trump's rallying cry: You don't hand matches to an arsonist, and you don't give power to an angry left-wing mob." (This would be in contrast to the torch-bearing, murderous Nazis in Charlottesville whom Trump described, at least in part, as "very fine people.")

Hillary: Allegations Against Bill Different Than Ones Against Trump, Kavanaugh

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., having fully morphed into a poisonous, reptilian Trump toady, is on it as well. But then, Graham was obviously one of the strategists behind Kavanaugh's explosive testimony in the hearing. He had telegraphed the white male rage tactic out in the hallway just prior, brushing off a rape survivor who was trying to talk to him by saying, "You should have told the cops." Clearly that was meant to suggest that women who don't report their rapes are not to be believed. As Salon's Amanda Marcotte wrote on Tuesday, the mask has fallen from Republicans' faces, at least for now, and the misogyny is staggering.

And on Monday evening he was the guest of honor at a ceremonial swearing-in at the White House. While Trump apologized on behalf of the nation for “the terrible pain and suffering” Kavanaugh and his family had experienced and declared him “proven innocent,” the new justice assured Americans that he would be fair and was taking the job with “no bitterness.”

US owes Kavanaugh an apology – USA – Chinadaily.com.cn

I have no doubt that, if the attack on Dr. Ford was as bad as she says, charges would have been immediately filed with local Law Enforcement Authorities by either her or her loving parents. I ask that she bring those filings forward so that we can learn date, time, and place!

Republicans have also exploited their insulting thesis that #MeToo is really about lying or delusional women falsely accusing men, which they are trying to spin into a female lament about sons and husbands and fathers and brothers being the real victims. Graham, naturally, finds a clever way to make the point:

Point of view “Any hopes that the new Foreign Secretary would tone down the rhetoric were quickly dispelled recently with Jeremy Hunts appalling and indefensible comparison of the EU to a Soviet prison- prompting Nigel Farage to remark that Hunt was now talking his language.”Seb Dance British Member of the European Parliament representing the Labour Party World

Twenty-nine days from now you've got a decision to make, America. Do you want to live in the world of Sen. [Mazie] Hirono where you're guilty until proven innocent because you're a Republican, or do you want to live in the Susan Collins world where you will be listened to and evaluated?

At the mention of Feinstein, who is the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee and the lawmaker whom Trump has accused of leaking to the media Christine Blasey Fords allegation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her, the crowd here chanted “lock her up!” — a phrase that previously had been reserved for 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Trump says he may pick new UN ambassador this month

Graham likes to use Hirono as his example of the angry woman trying to railroad the poor, white male, mostly because she made the statement "Men, shut up and step up" which he instinctively understands are fighting words to misogynist abusers. The fact that she is a woman of color makes it all the more potent.

Video: Trump invokes Kavanaugh to stir up Republican turnout

But what of our nice Republican white lady, Sen. Susan Collins, the woman the entire political world, including Democrats, has put on a pedestal for years as the representation of modest, feminine moderation? Trump was effusive in his compliments after her speech — and her vote to confirm Kavanaugh. He told the press, "I thought that Susan was incredible yesterday. She gave an impassioned, beautiful speech yesterday. And that was from the heart, that was from the heart."

Cardin, who serves on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, had a major role in handling Haleys confirmation. Unlike the narrow 50-48 margin on which the Senate approved Kavanaugh for the high court, Haley was approved on a nearly unanimous 96-4 vote after being nominated by President Trump.

Video: Trump invokes Kavanaugh to stir up Republican turnout

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He was referring to the speech in which Collins gaslighted the entire country with a paean to a man who doesn't exist, calling him an exemplary public servant, judge, teacher, coach, husband and father. She told the entire country that the real Brett Kavanaugh was not the angry, petulant, bully they watched testify in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. She whitewashed his record on health care and women's rights, insisting that the man who just months ago, as a federal appeals court judge, voted to force a 17-year-old rape victim to give birth against her will, was not a threat to Roe vs Wade.

While thats easy to forget in the wake of the epic Supreme Court confirmation fight, Cardin and other lawmakers have pointed to some areas of agreement. Among them is the sweeping piece of legislation, passed last week, that addresses the nations opioid crisis.

She attacked the protesters complaining about "dark money" being used to whip them into a "frenzy." Worst of all, she adopted the absurd line that while she believed Christine Blasey Ford had likely suffered an attack, Kavanaugh was not the attacker. This has become the "empathetic" approach among Republicans who can read polls and see that women are running from the party as fast as they can. 

But this line is nothing new. Women have been told they were "crazy" when they say things that people don't want to hear since the beginning of time. And the echoes of the cruder formulation deployed against Anita Hill back in 1991 — "a little bit nutty and a little bit slutty" — are obvious. It's progress, I suppose, that they dropped the "slutty" part in 2018.

Cal Thomas: Susan Collins finest hour

Collins was lobbied heavily by George W. Bush, Kavanaugh's benefactor, and her deceitful speech shows the final absorption of the tattered remains of the GOP establishment into Trumpism. Collins and Trump are now two sides of the same coin, bound together with a common willingness to tell their voters that they can believe them or they can believe their lying eyes.  It's all there is.


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