Bernie Sanders touts working-class message at Pittsburgh rally – Fox News

Bernie Sanders touts working-class message at Pittsburgh rally - Fox News
Can Bernie Sanders really win over Trump voters?
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., argued Sunday that among the presidential candidates, he was the best Democrat to win back a string of Midwestern states from President Trump in 2020, claiming that the sitting president had told working-class families a "monstrous lie" by vowing to take on monied interests in Washington.

"Donald Trump has told literally thousands of lies since he began his campaign and since he has been in the White House," Sanders told an estimated crowd of 4,500 at an outdoor rally in Pittsburgh. "But, the biggest lie that he told the people of Pennsylvania … was that he was going to stand up for working families and take on the establishment."

So today, I challenge Donald Trump: For once in your life, keep your campaign promises, the Vermont senator said. Go back to the drawing board on Nafta. Do not send this treaty to Congress unless it includes strong and swift enforcement mechanisms to raise the wages of workers and to prevent corporations from outsourcing American jobs to Mexico.

Sunday's rally wrapped up a four-day, five-state swing during which Sanders also held rallies in Wisconsin and Michigan. Voters in all three states backed Trump over Hillary Clinton in 2016, stunning Democrats who had seen them as part of a "blue wall" held together by urban African-American voters and traditionally liberal white working-class voters. The Sanders campaign said in a memo prepared in advance of the trip that the pathway to victory runs through the Midwest.

The remarks by Sanders set down a marker on whats likely to be a major issue in the 2020 election in a critical part of the country that drove Trumps victory in 2016. He channeled disenchantment with Nafta and the negative impact of free trade to narrowly win Michigan, which promises to be a major battleground state in 2020.

The memo said that Sanders has received donations from more than 8,000 people in Wisconsin, 14,000 in Michigan and 18,000 in Pennsylvania. Sanders was leading all Democratic candidates in fundraising.

Sanders heads to the Rust Belt to campaign; reaction and analysis from talk radio hosts Chip Franklin and Garrett Lewis.

(Bloomberg) — In the heart of the industrial Midwest, front-running Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders called on President Donald Trump to abandon his new Nafta deal.

Sanders had a good showing in the industrial belt in 2016's Democratic primary, winning Michigan, Indiana and Wisconsin. But Hillary Clinton pounded him by 12 percentage points in Pennsylvania.

"We are going to win in Pennsylvania, we’re going to win in Michigan, we're going to win in Wisconsin, we're going to win in Indiana and Ohio," Sanders promised his cheering supporters. "And, by the way, we’re going to win the election."

Video: Bernie Sanders speaks to union workers in Ottawa County

Earlier in Lordstown, Ohio, and again in Pittsburgh, Sanders pressed Trump to put action behind his words on General Motors plant closings. Trump has assailed the company for shutting its small-car factory in Lordstown, in a politically important state, complaining about the company's leadership and a local union leader while seldom mentioning the other U.S. factories that GM plans to close.

"If congress could provide a trillion dollar bailout to large the corporations and the banks that help destroy our economy we can make certain that we keep the promises that we made to workers in terms of their pensions," he said.

"If you want a federal contract paid for by taxpayers, treat your workers with respect and dignity. No more paying your workers inadequate wages while you provide CEO's with multimillion-dollar parachutes, no more taking away health care benefits, no more denying workers the right to form a union.

"Almost half of all new income created today going to one percent while tens of thousands of workers in Michigan and in Vermont and all over this country forced to work 2 or 3 jobs," Sen. Sanders said. 

"And if you are not a good and responsible corporate citizen, do not think that you will get federal contracts," Sanders added.

The senator from Vermont is not a billionaire but he is a self-proclaimed millionaire who took some heat this week for criticizing those with bank accounts with more zeros at the end.

The self-described democratic socialist said his political movement mirrored the labor movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement and the gay rights movement in showing that "real change never takes place from the top on down, always from the bottom up." He recited a laundry list of policies — including raising the federal minimum wage, government-run health care and legalizing marijuana — that he claimed were described as "too radical" by members of the media and political establishment.

WARREN, Mich (FOX 2) – Senator Bernie Sanders was out in Warren Saturday, just one of his stops in visiting battleground states in the Midwest this weekend. 

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS: WE NEED AN ECONOMY AND GOVERNMENT THAT WORKS FOR ALL, NOT JUST THE TOP ONE PERCENT

"Today, virtually all of those ideas are supported by a majority of the American people and they are ideas that Democratic candidates from school board to president of the United States now support," Sanders said, noting that his insurgent campaign for the 2016 Democratic nomination had netted "more votes from young people than Trump and Clinton combined."

Sanders also proudly noted that his supporters had campaigned successfully to change the party's rules governing superdelegates at next year's Democratic National Convention "and maybe ending a system in which one candidate had 500 superdelegates before the first vote was cast." The Democratic National Committee voted last summer to prevent superdelegates from voting on the first presidential nomination ballot unless a candidate had enough votes from pledged delegates, who choose a candidate based on the results of the Democrats' primaries and caucuses.

If Bernie Sanders meant radical as in fundamentally different than what’s out there, some of his ideas definitely are.

The Vermont senator also addressed his signature issue, vowing to health insurance companies that "whether you like it or not, the United States will join every other major country on earth and guarantee health care to all people as a right."

The crowds on Saturday were estimated at 1000 people at Macomb Community College south campus in Warren.   

"It is an international embarrassment that in America today we got 30 million people with no health insurance and even more who are underinsured with high deductibles and high co-payments and for all of that we end up spending twice as much per capita on healthcare as do the people of any other nation," said Sanders, who warned his audience that "the insurance companies are getting nervous" about his message.

He hit hard on some of the bread and butter issues like raising minimum wage and protecting pensions.

"They are prepared and will spend hundreds of millions of dollars to stop us," he said, "but we are gonna win this struggle and we will pass a Medicare for All single-payer program."

He said he supports the efforts of University of Pittsburgh faculty members to form a union, which has been ongoing since 2016 under the auspice of the Pittsburgh-based United Steelworkers. In March, the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board ruled against the university’s attempts to halt a union election by the Graduate Student Organizing Committee and the United Steelworkers.

Bernie Sanders ramped up an attack on Donald Trump on Sunday as he campaigned in Lordstown, Ohio, where General Motors has a languishing factory its likely to close permanently.

“Today, we say to the private health insurance companies: Whether you like it or not, the United States will join every other major country on Earth and guarantee health care to all people,” he said to raucous cheers. He also reiterated the idea that health care is a human right — something he said when running for president in 2016.

Sanders attacked tough guy president at forum for his part in the government shutdown earlier this year, family separations at the border and the area plant closure.

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Youre really tough on them, he said sarcastically of Trumps attitude toward corporate America. Well lets see how tough you are. Tell General Motors today, no more federal contracts

Hundreds of people of all ages had gathered two hours before the event started. By the time Sanders started speaking around 5:45 p.m., the park area was filled with about 4,500 supporters of the self-described democratic socialist. The estimates were provided by Pittsburgh police, which also had a heavy presence.

He said, Mr. president, I know how tough you are, snatching babies from the hands of their mothers. Well lets see how tough you are taking on corporate America, Sanders said.

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WATCH LIVE: Bernie Sanders holds rally Saturday in Warren

Bernie Sanders ramped up an attack on Donald Trump on Sunday as he campaigned in Lordstown, Ohio, where General Motors has a languishing factory its likely to close permanently

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Sanders said Trump should tell GM no more federal contracts until they restart production at the Lordstown plant

Sanders rallied in Wisconsin and Michigan before stumping in Pittsburgh, which capped a five-state, Midwest tour. He made other appearances in Indiana and in Lordstown, Ohio — General Motors’ latest casualty in the company’s automotive factory closures.

Sanders lit into Trump, whose seen here in Lima, Ohio last month, for not doing enough save factory workers jobs

For days, the U.S. Senator vying for the Democratic presidential nomination has been calling Trump a pathological liar in states that went for the Republican throughout the Midwest. 

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Video: Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders campaigning in Lordstown

He claimed in a Lordstown version of his remarks that Trump is not just a pathological liar, but he is a fraud and a demagogue whos fanning the flames of divisiveness.

Sanders said, in response to a question from a woman whose family had been affected by GMs restructuring proposal, Youre job is to do exactly the opposite, it is to bring people together.

He had been interrupted by a Trump supporter moments before, who screamed loudly that Sanders is a socialist as security carried him out of the venue, the auditorium of the local high school. 

Presidential-hopeful Bernie Sanders joins teachers union for Lordstown event

The mans outburst followed a complaint by another man in the audience that Trump did not come to Lordstown to hear directly from workers losing their jobs.

Sanders told him that the federal government has a lot of leverage and it could punish companies like GM by denying them future contracts.

He said that profitable plants should not be allowed to throw people out on the street and be rewarded with favorable federal action.

Watch Bernie Sanders town hall meeting in Lordstown on Facebook Live Sunday around 1 p.m.

Sanders said, in response to a question from a woman whose family had been affected by GMs restructuring proposal, Youre job is to do exactly the opposite, it is to bring people together

The forum hosted by the American Federation for Teachers national chapter provided a ready-made opportunity for Sanders to blast big businesses and financial institutions for robbing Peter the factory worker to pay Paul the investor

The forum hosted by the American Federation for Teachers national chapter provided a ready-made opportunity for Sanders to blast big businesses and financial institutions for robbing Peter the factory worker to pay Paul the investor.  

Bernie Sanders to hold rally Saturday in Warren where GM plant is closing

Sanders said Wall Streets illegal actions in 2007 and 2008 brought about the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression and destroyed our economy, resulting in millions of people losing their jobs and their homes, and despite his opposition in Congress, companies such as GM received $50 billion bailouts. 

Their thank you is to lay off workers in Lordstown and other factories around the country a decade later, he argued. 

To say the least, that does not show a lot of love and gratitude from Wall Street, he declared. Whether they like it or not, they will be good corporate citizens.

The Lordstown plant that General Motors operated stopped making the Chevy Cruze in March. It has been closed ever since. Workers are hopeful it will be reopened before operations come to a full halt in September. 

They believe GM may be engaging in scare tactics to get union to back off of their demands. Several said Sunday that they want GM to bring another car to the plant for production.

Bernie Sanders making stop in Coopersville Saturday

The Lordstown plant that General Motors operated stopped making the Chevy Cruze in March. It has been closed ever since. Workers are hopeful it will be reopened before operations come to a full halt in September


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