Red Bull Crashed Ice heads to Japan, Finland and Boston — but not St. Paul

Red Bull Crashed Ice heads to Japan, Finland and Boston — but not St. Paul
Red Bull Crashed Ice isnt returning to St. Paul
MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Red Bull Crashed Ice, the spectacle that brought hundreds of thousands of gawkers to St. Paul for the last eight winters, will not return in 2019.

Organizers announced Wednesday that the event will take place this winter in Japan and Finland, but the United States edition is moving to Bostons Fenway Park in February.

SportsCrashed Ice roars into St. Paul this weekendSportsCrashed Ice event returning to St. Paul this winterCity officials say Red Bulls Crashed Ice event is coming back for another round of reckless skating down St. Pauls Cathedral Hill. Last year the Minnesota debut of the extreme sport drew nearly 100,000 onlookers. The sport was born in Scandinavia when some daredevils tried skating down a bobsled run.

Crashed Ice wont be returning to St. Paul in 2019

It was incredible to host Red Bull Crashed Ice in Saint Paul. They were a great partner and though there are not plans for the event to return in 2019, we look forward to the opportunity to work with them again in the future.

Crashed Ice not returning to St. Paul this winter

The event, which first came to St. Paul in 2011, was one of the citys biggest tourist draws — bringing more than 100,000 spectators to downtown each year.

Thanks for watching!Visit WebsiteBut Red Bull's schedule for next year doesn't include the Minnesota capital, instead it's listing its three race destinations as Japan, Finland and Boston.

After seven consecutive seasons in Minnesotas capital, the extreme downhill racing event is moving on to Japan, Finland and Boston in 2019, according to its official website.

"They were a great partner, and though there are not plans for the event to return in 2019, we look forward to the opportunity to work with them again in the future," the city said.

The international competition had sent four-person heats of daredevil skaters flying down a 1,600-foot ice track that dropped 12 stories from the Cathedral of St. Paul. Crashed Ice had become a winter staple, attracting up to 120,000 spectators to downtown and the Cathedral Hill neighborhood.

Last February, Mayor Melvin Carter — donning protective gear and a Wild jersey — braved the winding course during a trial run ahead of the World Championships. It was Carters seventh time on the track, his first as mayor.

“It was incredible to host Red Bull Crashed Ice for seven years in St. Paul,” said Clare Cloyd, marketing manager at St. Paul Parks and Recreation. “There are not plans for the event to return in 2019.”

“It was incredible to host Red Bull Crashed Ice in St. Paul,” said Clare Cloyd, a St. Paul Parks and Recreation spokeswoman. “They were a great partner, and though there are not plans for the event to return in 2019, we look forward to the opportunity to work with them again in the future.”

St. Paul City Council Member Chris Tolbert said he enjoyed skating the track along with Mayors Chris Coleman and Melvin Carter. But he knew the citys host gig would end eventually.


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