Lawyers in torture case seek materials the CIA calls secret

Lawyers in torture case seek materials the CIA calls secret

Trump administration desperate to hide new CIA appointee's history with 'black site' prisons and torture

Mitchell and Jessen ran a Spokane-based company that received $81 million from the CIA to develop methods to extract information that included waterboarding and sleep deprivation. President Barack Obama terminated their contract in 2009. A U.S. Senate 

President Donald Trump's administration is fighting the CIA's new deputy director Gina Haspel from giving a deposition about her role in the agency's most severe methods of torture. Haspel was deposed by James Mitchell and John “Bruce” Jessen, who both

Testy exchange over CIA records marks hearing in civil torture case against Mitchell and Jessen

More than eight years after President Obama formally ended the CIA's torture program, the Trump administration is fighting to block the CIA's new deputy director from providing a deposition about her role in pioneering the agency's most abusive torture

James Mitchell, the former Spokane psychologist who designed and participated in the CIA's waterboarding of terrorism suspects, was interviewed Wednesday, Jan. 25, on FOX News. (Fox News). By Thomas Clouse tomc@spokesman.com(509) 459-5495.

A pair of U.S. psychologists accused of overseeing the torture of terrorism detainees more than a decade ago face reluctance from a federal judge to let them question the CIA's deputy director to show they were only following orders. The judge …

The psychologists ran a Spokane-based company that got $81 million from the CIA to develop methods to extract information that included waterboarding and sleep deprivation. Share story. By. MARTHA BELLISLE. Associated Press. Lawyers for two


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