How’d the Statue of Liberty end up on an American goalie mask anyway?

How\'d the Statue of Liberty end up on an American goalie mask anyway?
Guidelines Regarding Authorised Identifications – PyeongChang 2018 – ISU
nThe Statue of Liberty logo on two U.S. goalkeepers’ masks have been approved and no modifications are necessary, according to USA Hockey.

USA Hockey had been in talks with the International Olympic Committee after the IOC earlier requested that the logo be removed from the masks, according to a report from USA Today.

Nicole Hensley’s goalkeeper mask has a Statue of Liberty logo on the left side. Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY SportsThe IOC said that no item worn or used by a team may feature “the wording or lyrics from national anthems, motivational words, public/political messaging or slogans related to national identity.”

Guidelines Regarding Authorised Identifications – PyeongChang 2018 - ISU
Guidelines Regarding Authorised Identifications – PyeongChang 2018 – ISU

Nicole Hensley has a Liberty logo on the left side of her mask, and Alex Rigsby has one on the chin of hers.

USA Hockey says Statue of Liberty image on goalie masks approved

Hensley wore her mask and made 13 saves in the 5-0 win over the Russians on Tuesday.

“My designer sent me stamps and he said no one had done stamps before,” Rigsby said. “He sent me a bunch of different ones, and I thought the Statue of Liberty was pretty cool with the lines and Lady Liberty on it.”

Neither Hensley nor Rigsby played in Team USA’s 3-1 win over Finland on Sunday. Olympic rookie Maddie Rooney of the University of Minnesota-Duluth got the start.

USA goalies get OK to keep Statue of Liberty helmets

Team USA hockey goalkeeper Nicole Hensley, pictured, has been cleared by the International Olympic Committee to display the Statue of Liberty on her helmet as she competes in the 2018 Winter Games.  (REUTERS/David W Cerny)

IOC officials said its Guidelines Regarding Authorized Identifications include rules allowing athletes to display “national colors, name, flag and emblems” that are used “to visually enhance the national identity of their Items.” However, “No Item may feature the wording or lyrics from national anthems, motivational words, public/political messaging or slogans related to national identity.”

Team USA tunes out Statue of Liberty mask confusion at Winter Olympics

Team USA hockey players have been cleared to display their American pride at the 2018 Winter Olympics after it was reported that images of the Statue of Liberty on their helmets were deemed political statements.

US women's hockey goalies may have to remove Statue of Liberty image from masks
US women’s hockey goalies may have to remove Statue of Liberty image from masks

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was working with USA Hockey to determine whether the patriotic symbols on the helmets of goaltenders Nicole Hensley and Alex Rigsby would need to be removed, USA Today reported Monday night.

The IOC reportedly threatened the U.S. women’s hockey team with a ban of the patriotic image during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Goalie Maddie Rooney’s mask features the Statue of Liberty and two other goalies’ helmets incorporate images of a bald eagle and stars.

The committee had previously said the images needed to be removed from the safety equipment, as America’s Lady Liberty could be viewed as “political propaganda.”

The U.S. women’s hockey team defeated the Russians, 5-0, on Tuesday and will face Canada next. USA’s Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson set an Olympic record for the fastest back-to-back goals by a man or a woman, scoring 6 seconds apart in the second period Tuesday.

Team USA goaltenders Madeline Rooney, Alex Rigsby, Nicole Hensley train at the Kwandong Hockey Centre in Gangneung, South Korea on February 10, 2018.  (REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon)

The Americans will face Canada, who defeated the U.S. for a gold medal at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, on Thursday. No medal will be on the line this time, though, just positioning for the semifinals.

But the IOC quickly changed its tune, allowing the goalies to wear the masks as they are.

“Masks are approved,” USA Hockey spokeswoman Andrea Mazzarelli told Reuters. “No modifications needed.”

Granted the end result is the same, but USA Hockey seems to have had an entirely different understanding of the situation. So I went and knocked on the door of the IOC’s communications office and tried to ask for clarification, and the communication officers who happened to be there were not having it. They said the email was they only comment they would provide. They repeated this when I pointed out the discrepancy. When I asked about the Korean hockey player’s helmet they said they would look into it and get back to me. I went back around the hall and sent them the following questions in an email:
USA Hockey says Statue of Liberty image on goalie masks approved
USA Hockey says Statue of Liberty image on goalie masks approved

A spokesperson for IOC disputed the reports, telling the news service the situation “seems to have been a misunderstanding, we have not asked for the symbol to be removed.”

Report: IOC May Consider Statue Of Liberty A “Political Symbol,” Force Its Removal From USA Hockey Goalie MasksChris Mazdzer's Silver Left The Luge World Speechless Chloe Kim Gets Gold, Does Back-To-Back 1080s In Victory-Lap Third RunAbout the authorHannah KeyserHannah KeyserWriter/Producer

Team USA goalie Jonathan Quick, who competed in the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games was ordered to cover up “Support Our Troops” displayed on his helmet.  (REUTERS/Shaun Best )

Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter states: “No form of publicity or propaganda, commercial or otherwise, may appear on persons, on sportswear, accessories or, more generally, on any article of clothing or equipment whatsoever worn or used by the athletes or other participants in the Olympic Games.”

None of this really matters, but it’s odd to see the IOC struggling to provide straight answers regarding the application of their own rules at their marquee event. We’ll update if we hear anything from them.

US women’s hockey team, with Statue of Liberty on its masks, defeats Russia

It’s not uncommon for the IOC to order athletes to remove sayings from their gear.

Earlier this month, Canadian hockey player Matt Dalton, who’s playing for South Korea in the Games, was asked to remove a tribute to 16-century Korean naval commander Yi sun-shin, as the IOC found it too political, the National Post reported.

In 2014, Team USA goalie Jessie Vetter was ordered to remove “We the People” — the U.S. Constitution’s first three words — from her helmet.  (REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

In 2014, Team USA goalie Jessie Vetter was ordered to remove “We the People” — the U.S. Constitution’s first three words — from her helmet, which also had a photo of the Statue of Liberty, in addition to a Bald Eagle.

And in 2010, goalie Ryan Miller, of the men’s U.S. hockey team, had to remove the popular beer slogan “Miller Time” from his mask as he competed during the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. Jonathan Quick, also a goaltender, had to cover up “Support Our Troops” displayed on his helmet.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.


Posted in World