Get Into the Fat Tuesday Spirit With the Billboard Mardi Gras 2018 Playlist

Get Into the Fat Tuesday Spirit With the Billboard Mardi Gras 2018 Playlist
Mardi Gras in New Orleans: See the full recap from Feb. 13, 2018
nBourbon street is cleaned up after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

Empires Services cleans up on Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

This could be a temporary problem with your network, or due to your adblocker
Mardi Gras in New Orleans: See the full recap from Feb. 13, 2018
Mardi Gras in New Orleans: See the full recap from Feb. 13, 2018

Mardi Gras in New Orleans: See the full recap from Feb. 13, 2018

Empire Services cleans up Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

The New Orleans Police Department said in a statement Wednesday that investigators obtained an arrest warrant for 21-year-old Eddie Dingle on a second-degree murder charge. Dingle is suspected of fatally shooting a man Tuesday after a fight broke out near the city’s traditional parade route.
Instagram Highlights Of Last Night's French Quarter Mardi Gras Parties
Instagram Highlights Of Last Night’s French Quarter Mardi Gras Parties

Medal grates prevent trash from falling into catch basins on Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

Trash is raked to the center of Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

Thousands of people took to the streets Tuesday to mark the last day of the Carnival season. They watched the parades put on by Rex and Zulu as well as the truck parades that roll through the streets afterward.

Trash is raked into the middle of Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

People roamed the French Quarter in fancy costumes often sewn by hand, drinking cocktails and taking pictures of and with the other costumed revelers.

Party’s over: Raucous Fat Tuesday gives way to solemn Lent

Trash fills Bourbon street after Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Mardi Gras produces days of merriment, indulgence, a few hangovers — and a lot of garbage. Once the parades have passed and the beads have been thrown, the cleanup begins.

The Latest: Suspect named in deadly Mardi Gras shooting
The Latest: Suspect named in deadly Mardi Gras shooting

This year two New Orleans organizations aimed to change things with a pilot recycling project to collect cans, plastic bottles and that ubiquitous Mardi Gras accessory dangling from fences, trees and balconies: beads.

According to a report by WWL, a CBS-affiliated television station, a New Orleans resident, Carmen Cousin, who attended the parade said she was astonished when she saw her four-year-old son with a black faced figurine during the parade.
The Latest: Suspect named in deadly Mardi Gras shooting
The Latest: Suspect named in deadly Mardi Gras shooting

Hannah Kincannon heads recycling efforts for the Young Leadership Council, which has partnered with local events and festivals to help make them greener. She said Mardi Gras is how the city represents itself to the world.

Bond said, “Those were designed to make African American people and slaves sub-human. That was what they viewed us as. That’s what they thought we were and that’s all we were good for, was being servants. And ugly.”

“We really want to represent ourselves as a city that has a sustainable mindset,” she said. “Just like Mardi Gras is something that everyone can participate in, recycling is something everyone can participate in.”

NEW ORLEANS (AP) The Mardi Gras party is over in New Orleans.After days of parades, balls, king cake and costumes, Fat Tuesday has concluded and the city is entering a period of restraint with Lent.Thousands of people took to the streets Tuesday to mark the last day of the Carnival season. They watched the parades put on by Rex and Zulu as well as the truck parades that roll through the streets afterward.Rex is the city’s oldest parading group. Group members decorated many of their floats this year to commemorate the city’s 300th anniversary.People roamed the French Quarter in fancy costumes often sewn by hand, drinking cocktails and taking pictures of and with the other costumed revelers.There were people dressed up as glamorous vampires, President Donald Trump and Pac-Man, just to name a few.

Rex had some competition for the role of king of Carnival on Fat Tuesday as the sun made a welcome appearance and banished any disappointment …

Viewers with disabilities can get assistance accessing this station’s FCC Public Inspection File by contacting the station with the information listed below. Questions or concerns relating to the accessibility of the FCC’s online public file system should be directed to the FCC at 888-225-5322, 888-835-5322 (TTY), or [email protected]

Three killed and five wounded as shootings mar Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans

Mardi Gras generates hundreds of millions of dollars and brings thousands of visitors to the city. But it has an environmental impact. Earlier this year, the city announced it had cleared out 93,000 pounds (42,200 kilograms) of beads clogging catch basins.

Station Contact Info: WILX500 American RoadLansing, MI 48911517-393-0110

Stephen Sauer, executive director of Arc of Greater New Orleans, which is working with YLC, said the beads are toxic and have a tendency to twist and make knots.

New Orleans Mardi Gras ends in violence

“Anytime we can avoid getting beads in landfills and out of the catch basins, the better we are,” he said.

Following the lead float, King Elexis I John Lafayette Finley IV and Queen Tiffani Samantha Hall put their scepters aside and launched throws of every type into the bright Tuesday sunshine. One particular band of merry-makers obviously known to the regal couple was treated to entire bags and boxes full of treats: beads, MoonPies and oatmeal cream pies.

ArcGNO, which helps people with intellectual disabilities, already had a project where they accept, sort and resell beads to the krewes that put on the various parades. But that relied on people bringing their beads after the parades were over.

This year, the two organizations went to the source. They set up six recycling centers to collect beads, plastic bottles and aluminum cans. Volunteers also handed out bags for people to fill, and trucks traveled behind the parade to collect the recyclables.

The breadth of the Mammoth parade was matched by its music, and it didn’t all emanate from college bands. In addition to Mobile’s Magnolia Breeze Community Band, other Alabama marching corps from Wilcox County, Evergreen, Fairfield and Chickasaw joined a band from Greenville, Mississippi, to score the parade.

Rainy weather curtailed the pilot project, but Sauer was still encouraged by the enthusiasm they encountered among parade goers — people like New Orleans resident Dorie DeLuca.

New Orleans police secured a warrant Wednesday to arrest the man suspected of a fatal shooting along the St. Charles Avenue parade route on Mardi Gras, a day on which a trio of shootings left police “disgusted” and “outraged” but not “discouraged,” Superintendent Michael Harrison said. 

NOPD Mounted Police Officers wait on Canal and Bourbon before the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

Tuesday was not the first time Dingle has been accused of either illegally using or possessing a weapon. Grambling State University police on Jan. 11 booked him into the Lincoln Parish jail on an allegation of illegally possessing a weapon. 

Police Chief Michael Harrison waves to Bourbon Street patrons during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

“Vicious gang activity” is one of the prime reasons behind shootings like the one in the Lower 9th Ward, Harrison said at a news conference Wednesday afternoon. In the other two Mardi Gras shootings, he said those involved knew one another.

Jacob Jones, right, dressed as a banana, pets the nose of a police horse during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

One of the youths was in critical condition after being shot in the head. The other was in stable condition with a leg wound, according to the NOPD, which released an image of a suspect in the case late Tuesday night.

Mardi Gras revelry fills New Orleans

Bourbon Street patrons watch the Police Officers march by during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

Police Chief Michael Harrison waves to Bourbon Street patrons during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

New Orleans Mardi Gras marred by shootings as 3 hurt, spectators rattled

NOPD mounted police officers raise their whips at the end of the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

Mardi Gras brings some changes

Billy Kelly shakes hands with officers during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

A witness at the scene, Chicago resident Toya Hudson, said she was watching the parade when she heard seven gunshots. She saw one person with an injury to the back of his head.

A mounted police officer grabs the shirt of a bar patron who was harassing him during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

Police Chief Michael Harrison, left, shakes hands with mounted officers during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

NOPD marches down Bourbon Street while people watch on during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

NOPD Mounted Police Officers march past cheering bar patrons during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

A man appeared to have been shot twice during a separate fight, and died after being rushed to the hospital, Police Chief Michael Harrison said. Police named Eddie Dingle, 21, as a suspect and said investigators obtained a warrant for his arrest on a second-degree murder charge.

NOPD mounted police officers raise their whips at the end of the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

Police Chief Michael Harrison speaks to media during the Midnight Sweep of Bourbon Street in New Orleans, La., on Mardi Gras Day, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.

“I think it’s great because if you’re here after the parade has finished, you see all the trash on the ground. Recycling cans, it’s so easy,” DeLuca said.

Another parade-goer, Jennifer Chamberlain, said she was heartened to see the volunteers picking beads off the ground and handing out bags. She’s brought her beads to Arc’s facility before, but having them picked up along the route was more convenient.

“You want to catch stuff, but you don’t really want to bring it home,” she said.

Bridgette Miramon, from waste management company Republic Services, which volunteered to collect the bottles and cans, says the region has traditionally trailed the rest of the country when it comes to recycling. But she said that when she walked behind the recycling trucks, people were so excited they were “high fiving me and hugging me.”

She said they collected a little less than half a ton of cans and plastic bottles. Miramon was also “blown away” by the low level of contamination — other materials like pizza mixed in with the recyclables.

This isn’t the first attempt at a Mardi Gras recycling project. A previous volunteer effort called “Verdi Gras” was tried a few years ago. ArcGNO also had a float where people could throw their beads back at the end of the parade, but that was discontinued out of safety concerns. Sauer said interest in recycling now seems higher in the city and among some of the krewes.

Two men shot near Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans CBD, police say; one critical

Cynthia Sylvain-Lear, who heads the city’s Department of Sanitation, said cleanup workers don’t have time to sort through garbage looking for recyclables at the end of the parades, so any recycling effort has to rely on people along the routes. She called this year’s effort a start that might could be expanded in the future.

Kincannon from YLC said the organization aims to expand the recycling effort to more Mardi Gras parades next year and is working on recycling projects in conjunction with the other parades the city has throughout the year.

There’s also an effort to make the beads themselves more environmentally friendly. LSU biological sciences professor Naohiro Kato has developed a process using microalgae that will make biodegradable beads — usually three times as expensive as standard beads — more affordable. These beads that break down in months instead of hundreds of years could be another way to reduce Mardi Gras’ environmental impact.

Holidays converge in 2018

“There’s not just one way to solve it,” Kato said. “We should tackle it from a number of different ways.”


Posted in World